BLACK SQUARE DISPLACEMENT - Utilization of Kazimir Malevich's Artworks, 1900-1914

BLACK SQUARE DISPLACEMENT - Utilization of Kazimir Malevich's Artworks, 1900-1914.

Kazimir Malevich's "Black Square" is utilized as a transformational zone to displace his artworks, 1900-1914. These artworks were created prior to his Suprematism and "Black Square". Malevich might approve of this treatment since he became bored with most, if not all, art movements and their creations. More than likely, he looked back on his early artworks ... including his Cubist experimentations ... in the same manner, and probably wondered why he had not reached the Suprematist state sooner.

To displace is to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense. This shift in the following "Black Square Displacement" images transforms Malevich's artworks into abstractions that go beyond the art movements ...

Impressionism, Pointillism, Symbolism, Post-Impressionism, Cloisonnism, Art Nouveau (Modern), Fauvism, Naïve Art (Primitivism), Cubism, Cubo-Futurism, Expressionism  

 ... in which he was working, 1900-1914. The displaced images are "broken" ... "out of the norm" ... as it relates to their respective art movements. The nine panels created by the displacement represent the number "9", which is a symbol of completeness and finality.

Malevich stated that his "Black Square" ... first exhibited in December of 1915 during the exhibition, The Last Exhibition of Futurist Painting 0.10 (Zero-Ten) in Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) Russia ... represented "ground zero" - an "end" (finality) and a new start in the history of art. 

Again, these displacements on Malevich's "Black Square" are indicative of his journey within his early artworks (1900-1914) to eventually arrive at Suprematism. The shifting (movement) seen in the images are reflected in his Suprematist works of 1915 and later.

On a "baser" note, the displaced images could be interpreted as a view through a prison cell. In autumn 1930, Malevich was arrested and interrogated by the KGB in Leningrad, accused of Polish espionage, and threatened with execution. He was released from imprisonment in early December.

The government of Joseph Stalin turned against forms of abstraction, considering them a type of "bourgeois" art, that could not express social realities. As a consequence, many of his works were confiscated and he was banned from creating and exhibiting similar art. Critics derided Malevich's art as a negation of everything good and pure: love of life and love of nature. (Wp)


Three Women on the Road,1900
Impressionism



Underwear on the Fence, 1903
Impressionism



Spring Garden in Blossom, 1904
Impressionism


Birkenhain, 1905
Impressionism



Church, 1905
Pointillism



Winter Landscape, 1906
Pointillism



Portrait of a Member of the Artist's Family, c.1906
Pointillism



Prayer, 1907
Symbolism



Self-Portrait, 1907
Symbolism



Sketch for Fresco1907
Symbolism



The Wedding, 1907
Post-Impressionism, Cloisonnism



Triumph of the Skies, 1907
Symbolism



Woman Picking Flowers, 1908
Symbolism



Oak and Dryads, c.1908
Symbolism, Art Nouveau (Modern)



Resting. Society in Top Hats, 1908
Post-Impressionism, Cloisonnism



River in Forest, 1908
Impressionism



Veil, 1908
Symbolism, Art Nouveau (Modern)



A Scene from the Drama of Leonid Andreev Anathema, 1909
Symbolism



Self-Portrait, 1910
Fauvism



Sisters, 1910
Impressionism



Town, 1910
Symbolism



Argentine Polka, 1911
Naïve Art (Primitivism)



Bather, 1911
Fauvism



Gardener, 1911
Fauvism



Self-Portrait, c.1911
Fauvism



Still Life, c.1911
Fauvism



Taking in the Harvest, 1911
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Cubism



Floor Polishers, 1912
Cubism



Peasant Woman, 1912
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Cubo-Futurism



Province, 1912
Cubism



Reaper, 1912
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Cubism



The Knife Grinder, 1912
Cubo-Futurism



Woodcutter, 1912
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Cubism



Peasant Woman with Buckets and a Child, c.1912
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Cubism, Expressionism



Peasant Women in a Church, c.1912
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Expressionism



Study for Portrait of a Peasant, c.1912
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Naïve Art (Primitivism)



The Reaper on Red, 1913
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Cubism



Bureau and Room, 1913
Cubism



Cow and Fiddle, 1913
Cubism



Head of a Peasant Girl, c.1913
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Cubism



Lady on a Tram Station, 1913
Cubo-Futurism



Morning in the Village after Snowstorm, 1913
Series: 1st Peasant Cycle
Cubo-Futurism



Musical Instrument, 1913
Cubism



Portrait of Ivan Kliun, 1913
Cubo-Futurism



Portrait of M.V. Matyushin, 1913
Cubo-Futurism



Station Without a Stop. Kunzevo., 1913
Cubo-Futurism



The Lady at the Piano, 1913
Cubo-Futurism



Vanity Box, 1913
Cubism



Aviator, c.1914
Cubism



Composition with the Mona Lisa, 1914
Cubism



Englishman in Moscow, 1914
Cubism



Guard, 1914
Cubo-Futurism



Lady at the Poster Column, 1914
Cubo-Futurism



Living in a Big Hotel, 1914
Cubo-Futurism



Soldier of the First Division, 1914
Cubism




















































































 


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